5 x Healthier

The United Nations believe 80% of illnesses and deaths in developing countries is due to contaminated drinking water.

That means safe water can prevent four out of every five illnesses.

Disaster Aid Australia has seen the truth of this statistic.

Our installations In India in conjunction with Disaster Aid India and the Diganta Swaraj Foundation Reduced School Absences by 88%

The water is not only safer and looks cleaner. . . . but it tastes better because our SkyHydrants don’t add chemicals in the filtration process.

WHICH WOULD YOU DRINK?

If you would like to help Disaster Aid Australia continue to help improve health in developing countries then click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.

WASH Myth No 2 – Stream Sample Means Safe

Photo from WikiMedia (Cirosantilli2)

One of the standard methods of looking at water quality is to sample a stream.

However a very low, or zero, bacteria result doesn’t mean the location is a safe source.

Below are three reasons why a low bacteriological sample value may not be providing good information:

Sample Not Truly Representative

The typical stream sample is 1 Litre.

Even a small stream is likely to have a flow of up to 500litres/min, thats 720,000 litres per day.

That means you are sampling 0.00014% of that days flow, hardly representative!

Changing Water Quality

Water Quality in a stream is not consistant, for example:

  • Rainfall will wash dirt and faeces into the stream.
  • Dry periods, with low flows, may concentrate any contamination
  • Animals, birds, and humans live in the catchment and may use it for washing, and defacation.

Sampling Protocols

For accurate testing extensive protocols need to be performed, for example:

  • Proper preparation of sample bottles;
  • Refrigerate samples during transport:
  • Deliver to an accredited laboratory on day of collection;

For a full range of protocols see this Tasmanian Goverment document Community Water Samples

Without the correct protocols, which may be difficult in many developing countries, the may be very large.

The Value of Water Testing

The above problems do not mean that water testing shouldn’t be carried out.

Water Tests are valuable for:

  • Comparing bacterial quality of different sources of water for a community.
  • Providing Information on the types of natural chemicals in the water that can cause health concerns, for instance arsenic, and flouride.
  • Identifying pollution from industrial processes and mining.

How To Achieve Safe Water

The best way to ensure safe drinking water is:

  • Having a source water that is free of harmfull chemicals.
  • Have a treatment system that reliably removes ALL bacteria from the water.

Disaster Aid Australia continue to install SkyHydrants, as they have proved highly effective at removing all bacteria from water.

This has reduced illness in serviced communities by more than 70%.

Every dollar donated to Disaster Aid Australia’s ‘Safe Water for Every Child’ program provides one person with safe water for one year.
To Help click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.

More Installations In Bhutan

Dechencholing School

With over 62% of the population having been double vaccinated and over 73% having one shot our installation team have been back on the road.

Langthel School

They have recently completed six installations in the Western part of Bhutan.

Mendrelgang School

The monsoon season makes travel in many parts difficult due to frequent landslides blocking roads, in the steep valleys.

Sergithang School

The majortiy of schools remaining in the ‘Bhutan 2020 Project’ however have been busy constructing the SkyHydrant buildings.

Tango School

As the Monsoon season ends hoping they are planning to complete installtions to schools in the Eastern part of Bhutan in the next couple of months.

Ura School

If you would like to help Disaster Aid Australia continue to help children in developing countries have ‘Safe Drinking Water’ click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.

Sustainable Safe Water

A key consideration for Disaster Aid Australia’s ‘Safe Water for Every Child’ program is sustainability.

Financial Sustainability

President and Past President of the Rotary Club

It is important that the community ensures that there is enough money to pay for:

  • Cleaning Chemicals.
  • Replacement of the filter membrane (typically after 10 years)
  • The operators time for the daily cleaning.

This photographs shows how the cooperative in Barangay. Mambuaya, on the outskirts of Cagayan de Oro have responded to the problem.

They have connected the SkyHydrant system to two water dispensing machines in the small building.

Water flows into the containers when the a coin is dropped into the machine.

Collecting as little as AU$1 will save enough money for the membrane replacment and cleaning chemicals!

The installation was sponsored, with the aid of a Rotary Global Grant by the Rotary Club of West Cagayan de Oro.

Greenhouse Gases

In 2018 Disaster Aid Australia was recognised by the Energy Globe Awards as being the best energy sustainable project in Australia.

This was due to the fact that our SkyHydrants provide safe water without power or treatment chemicals.

It was also one of the top four water projects in the World Awards.

Plastic Waste Reduction

One of the problems around the world is the amount of plastic waste which affects wildlife and gets inot the food chain.

Every SkyHydrant installed means that the community protected no longer needs to buy bottled water to stay safe.

That mean that there will be no need to dispose of tens of thousands of single use plastic bottles every year.

If you would like to help Disaster Aid Australia continue to provide Sustainable safe water click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.

Two Safe Water Projects for the Philippines

Disaster Aid Australia has decided to commence two Safe Water for Every Child’ projects in the Philippines.

The projects will be carried out with our long-term partner based on the island of Mindanao, the Balay Mindanaw Foundation.

Bangsamoro Health and Peace Project

This Bangsamoro Region of Mindanao is one of the poorest in the Philipppines and in the recent past has suffered from armed rebellion.

The Balay Mindanaw Foundation have been a key influencer in the peace process over the past three years.

They feel that providing communities with better health, through safe water, is key to improving living standards.

This will strongly demonstrate to those communities the benefits of peace.

Our project is based on providing SkyHydrant installations to at least five communities a year for the next five years.

Mindano Safe Water Project

This project is based on providing safe water to the remaining regions of Mindanao.

Past projects have resulted in reduction in illness in the communities of more than 70%

Again this project is based on providing SkyHydrant installations to at least five communities a year, for the next five years.

Timing

Balay Mindanw are currently engaged in carrying out investigations on rural Barangays (villages) to identify 10 locations for installations.

In the next few months the first five Barangays, for each project, will be identified and a full consultation will be carried out.

This will confirm that they accept the SkyHydrant solution, and will participate in the installation, as well as the ongoing operation.

SkyHydrants will be shipped later this year for installation by the end of June 2022.

Sponsorship Opportunities

You can sponsor a SkyHydrant installation for one of these projects for $5,000.

That is less than $1 for every person protected for one year.

All sponsors will be acknowledged with a plaque on the SkyHydrant, photographs of the installation, and a certificate from Disaster Aid Australia.

If you would like to help Disaster Aid Australia continue to help the Philippines with ‘Safe Water for Every Child’ projects click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.

Build Back Better

When Disaster Aid Australia responds to a disaster one of the key elements in helping those affected is ‘Shelter’.

Our SmartAid approach to Shelter is to help people repair and/or rebuild their homes.

The first step in this approach is to arrange for in-country purchase of materials, which we have found is faster, and less expensive, than trying to import materials or temporary accomodation.

Distribution of building materials, Philippines

By helping those affected build their home, rather than provide temporary accomodation, we help build pride and certaintly.

A second step is to help people build more resilient homes, a process known as ‘Build Back Better’.

Build Back Better -Timber Frames

Timber frame construction is quite common in the Asia Pacific region.

When ‘Building Back Better‘ we help people rebuild homes with;

  • Foundations that tie the building down, and the structure together;
  • Bracing against movement:
  • Stronger fixings
Rebuilt home in the Philippines

These make the buildings more resilient to the typhoons that sweep the pacific on a regular basis.

Build Back Better – Masonry

Although masonry construction is generally more resistant to typhoons is can be severly damaged by earthquakes.

Our help for rebuilding masonry homes in earthquake regions includes:

  • Strong foundations;
  • Reinforcing the walls horizontally and vertically with reinforced concrete columns at corners and openings;
  • A lightweight roof.
Rebuilt Home in Chiapas, Mexico

If you would like to help Disaster Aid Australia continue to help disaster affected people ‘Build Back Better’ with Smart Aid . . . click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.

Celebrating International Day of Friendship

On the ‘International Day of Friendship‘ it is a time for our volunteers, and supporters, to appreciate and promote the friendships developed through Disaster Aid Australia’s activities.

Friendship means empathy, compassion and concern for other people.

Valuing and celebrating friendship fosters these characteristics and gives a more selfless and grateful outlook on life. 

Through working alongside our Disaster Aid International partners we have developed friendships in Britain, Malaysia, Canada, the USA, Czech Republic, and India.

By helping people in the Philippines, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Timor Leste, and many other developing countries we have built strong frienships with our delivery partners.

Some Ways to celebrate:

  • Contact a friend and have a chat; 
  • Reach out to someone who you’ve not spoken to; 
  • Think about what unites people instead of what separates us;
  • Volunteer, and help others. 

If you would like the opportunity to find friends in other countries, why not become involved in Disaster Aid Australia.

Contact us at admin@disasteraidaustralia.org.au

SkyHydrant in Shipping Container for Timor Leste

During Construction

Disaster Aid Australia have been pleased to play a small part in this project by Rotary Projects Timor-Leste East (RPTLE), based in Western Australia.

The unit is now supplying 10,000 litres of clean filtered potable water every day to the students and the local community of the Don Bosco centre in Comoro, Dhili.

The project of the Rotary Club of Kwinana , led by project manager Max Bird, also involved considerable support from the Rotary Club of Phillip Island and San Remo, in Victoria.

With the problems of COVID the role of Brother Adriano and the students of The Don Bosco Technical Training Centre has been vital in completing the construction.

The Completed Project

Prior to its final installation the SkyHydrant was used in a temporary installation in response to the Dhili Floods in April this year.

If you would like to help Disaster Aid Australia continue to help children in developing countries, such as Timor Leste, have ‘Safe Drinking Water’ click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.

100% Aid Delivered In 2020-2021

In the financial year, which has just closed, Disaster Aid Australia delivered $240,661 in international aid to developing countries.

This was slightly over our annual income for the year of $239,144 (which was down approximately 30% from our pre COVID income).

The result is due to the DAA Board deciding in June 2020 that the COVID 19 Pandemic was a ‘Disaster‘ and many of the developing countries, which we help, would be hit harder than Australia.

Accordingly a considerable portion of the financial reserves that enable us to respond to disasters has been used over the past 12 months.

This 3 minute video shows photographs of the many aid projects we have assisted in the last 12 months.

With the pandemic travel restrictions we have only been able to deliver this aid due to the strong partnerships we have built up since DAA was founded in 2010.

Our Philippine partner Balay Mindanaw was also able to build links with the following Rotary Clubs during the Typhoon Goni response: RC of Pasig, RC of Legaspi North, and RC of West Cagayan de Oro.

We also wish to thank: Rotary Clubs, individuals, and companies around Australia for their continuing support of DAA in what has been a difficult year.

If you would like to help Disaster Aid Australia in 2021-2022 continue to help developing countries with ‘Smart Aid’ and ‘Safe Water for Every Child’ projects click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.

Bhutan Team Back At Work

After a period when the Bhutan Installation Team have been restricted, with COVID lockdowns, installations have now restarted.

The photographs show the installation underway at the Drukgyel Lower Secondary School.

The existing water source of the school comes from a branch of a stream about 5 km away from the school.

The source of the water was never a safe one and especially in monsoon when it became muddy.

The filter was installed on 23rd June 2021.

With the installation of the filter, the school is now enjoying a safe drinking water.

The project protects 800 students and 50 staff.

If you would like to help Disaster Aid Australia continue to help children in developing countries have ‘Safe Drinking Water’ click on the link below;

DONATE

Charity donations of $2 or more to Disaster Aid Australia are tax-deductible in Australia.